Monday, October 31, 2016

Support the Homadic lifestyle

For 95 thousand years, humans were hunter-gatherers, roaming in tribes of around 150. Living in fixed locations is a relatively recent phenomena, starting about 10K years ago. Our genes and our brains still bear the imprints of our nomadic lifestyle. And communities across the world, like the Bedouin, Roma (Gypsies), Sami, San, Mongols, Australian Aborigines and many others continue a tradition of nomadic living. And some of our favorite musicians are nomadic, and have written songs about it.

And yet, we look down upon those who choose (and many that don't) a lifestyle which doesn't involve living in a fixed home by calling those that don't home-less. And further, by calling out one aspect of their current state in life, when they indeed have many attributes that comprise who they are as human beings. We aim to change this. Our first step was to introduce a new word, which de-stigmatizes this way of living and hearkens back to our ancient roots: homadic. A portmanteau, comprised of "home" + "nomadic." What's in a word? Why, everything! Try using homadic to describe the next person you see with a sign at an intersection and you will find yourself thinking about them differently. Now you can give yourself permission to greet them, just as you would another human you meet. And you might empathize more with them by not seeing them as victims, but as fellow-humans trying to make it in the world.

Let's be clear: we love the initiatives and efforts that help those who haven't chosen homadicisim in their lives. There are issues of mental health and addiction that cause individuals to lose control over themselves and their situation. But we are also saying that while someone is homadic, there are lots of ways we can make their lives easier and we should. Living across a city (or indeed, a country, how about RV-owners?!) is just as valid a choice as living in a dwelling. If someone has chosen homadicisim, then a great city will be homadic-friendly.

Our ongoing work is to advocate for homadic-friendly cities and to encourage companies to create homadic-friendly products and services. This blog will explore how this can be done. 
How do cities create nomadic-friendly design? With a few adjustments, this bench could be easily used to sleep on. First, the middle handrest need to be removed; second, the gap between the back and sitting section needs to be filled in. 



Support the Homadic lifestyle

For 95 thousand years, humans were hunter-gatherers, roaming in tribes of around 150. Living in fixed locations is a relatively recent phenomena, starting about 10K years ago. Our genes and our brains still bear the imprints of our nomadic lifestyle. And communities across the world, like the Bedouin, Roma (Gypsies) and many others continue a tradition of nomadic living.

And yet, we look down upon those who choose (and many that don't) a lifestyle which doesn't involve living in a fixed home by calling those that don't home-less. And further, by calling out one aspect of their current state in life, when they indeed have many attributes that comprise who they are as human beings. We aim to change this. Our first step was to introduce a new word, which de-stigmatizes this way of living and hearkens back to our ancient roots: homadic. A portmanteau, comprised of "home" + "nomadic." What's in a word? Why, everything! Try using homadic to describe the next person you see with a sign at an intersection and you will find yourself thinking about them differently. Now you can give yourself permission to greet them, just as you would another human you meet. And you might empathize more with them by not seeing them as victims, but as fellow-humans trying to make it in the world.

Let's be clear: we love the initiatives and efforts that help those who haven't chosen homadicisim in their lives. There are issues of mental health and addiction that cause individuals to lose control over themselves and their situation. But we are also saying that while someone is homadic, there are lots of ways we can make their lives easier and we should. Living across a city (or indeed, a country, how about RV-owners?!) is just as valid a choice as living in a dwelling. If someone has chosen homadicisim, then a great city will be homadic-friendly.

Our ongoing work is to advocate for homadic-friendly cities and to encourage companies to create homadic-friendly products and services. This blog will explore how this can be done.